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Capt'n W. Kidd
Capt'n W. Kidd - reviews
Privateer Kidd
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german text about Capt'n W. Kidd
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Reviews


    " However, while each game using the same pieces and movement rules, the three games are actually fairly different in play.
    ...
    Loyal Captain is a nice abstract game which doesn’t feel as dry as it could/should. The game moves along quickly ... While my kids usually do OK with games rated for 9 or 10 year olds, they didn’t get this one at all – the logic needed to place and move the pieces was a bit too much for them. I’ll probably have to wait a few more months and try it again as I think they’ll be able to get the hang of it soon.
    ...
    The second offering is a called Quedah Merchant – while still a tactical abstract game, it brings luck into play a bit more as you rely on the roll of a die for movement ... This should turn out to be a good game for the kids to continue to experiment with. The rules are simple to follow, and it is clear that they enjoy playing it. ... Games of Quedah Merchant still go by quickly – usually under 15 minutes.
    ...
    The final game included in the rules is called Madagascar which takes the capturing idea from Quedah Merchant and expands it into a more interesting game. This game also has the advantage of being able to be played by 2 or 3 players – so I can play a game with both of my boys. ... The boys seemed to pick this one up fairly easily as well, though they weren’t as good at checking to see if their pieces would be vulnerable to capture after them moved them. However, I expect that this is a skill that they will improve at with practice.
    ...
    Overall, I think that the three games offered in Capt’n W. Kidd are good to very good. If they were sold alone, there might not be quite enough there to merit a purchase, but getting the three good games together provides a nice package which should give you a lot of enjoyment. All three of the games should also be suitable for younger gamers, and this might be a great way to introduce them to some more abstract style games."

    (Dale Yu, see full review at www.boardgamenews.com )


    "The play of 'Loyal Captain' proceeds in a simple fashion. On your turn you will either place one of your tokens on a start space or move one of your tokens to an empty, adjacent space. Frequently all the start spaces will fill up before anyone moves out from them, but this is not required in 'Loyal Captain.' The goal is to eliminate all you opponent's tokens by surrounding them. Any token or group of same-color tokens which is threatened from all sides is captured. This has a certain similarity to Go in this sense. A token only threatens the spaces to which it could move, that is, it never threatens a piece which is behind it.
    ...
    I don't know how deep the tactics may go in this game, as I have only played twice, but I enjoy it. I don't think it is nearly so deep as anything like Chess or Go, but it may approach a game like Nine Men's Morris. (which is another game I enjoy) It could be that when the novelty wears off I will not have much use for the game but at this point I'll give it a thumbs up. I'd recommend it to those who enjoy light abstract tactical games and are looking for something different."

    (Nathan James, see full review at boardgamegeek.com )


    "While 'Loyal Captain' is a wholly non-random game, the game 'Quedah Merchant' uses a die which gives results from 1-3. It is in a sense a 'roll and move' game.
    ...
    Overall, I don't find the game nearly as interesting as the 'Loyal Captain' version. But it is a decent option for when you want something a bit lighter on the forethought aspect. It is less like chess and more comparable to backgammon, in that you are forced to move according to the dice so you are looking to find the most flexible positions. It certainly is possible for two players who don't quite 'get it' to spend a lot of time going back and forth capturing each other's pieces and freeing their own. Certainly the wise player will concentrate more on depriving his opponent of flexibilty, knowing that if the opponent can move the spaces demanded by the die the game ends in a loss for the unfortunate soul.

    I think including this version certainly gives Capt'n W. Kidd wider appeal. Not everyone wants to carefully think through the tactical ramifications of a no-luck game. "

    (Nathan James, see full review at boardgamegeek.com )
 


 
Rules
order
Capt'n W. Kidd
Capt'n W. Kidd - reviews
Privateer Kidd
Pirat-Links
german text about Capt'n W. Kidd
Info international



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